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Dragons Love Tacos, by Rubin
         
This scrumptious read-aloud has a whole lot of kick!

Dragons love tacos. They love chicken tacos, beef tacos, great big tacos, and teeny tiny tacos. So if you want to lure a bunch of dragons to your party, you should definitely serve tacos. Buckets and buckets of tacos. Unfortunately, where there are tacos, there is also salsa. And if a dragon accidentally eats spicy salsa . . . oh, boy. You're in red-hot trouble.

The award-winning team behind Those Darn Squirrels! has created an unforgettable, laugh-until-salsa-comes-out-of-your-nose tale of new friends and the perfect snack.




Diary of a Parent Trainer, by Jennifer Smith
         
Meet Katie Sutton. She may just look like your average thirteen-year-old girl but in reality, she's the world's leading expert in Grown Up behavior. And you're in luck because in your hands you hold a one-of-a-kind guide to training your parent and becoming highly skilled at: understanding their insane behavior, predicting their next moves, and operating them to your best advantage. So please keep this book out of the way of your grown up, we don't want them going into "grumpy mode" too soon.




Princess Posey and the First Grade, by Stephanie Greene
         
Posey is very nervous about starting first grade and walking into school all by herself. Worst of all, she has to do it without the one thing that always makes her feel brave and special: the tutu that turns her into the Pink Princess. How will Posey face the first day of school without it?




The Mark of Athena (Heroes of Olympus, by Rick Riordan
         

In The Son of Neptune, Percy, Hazel, and Frank met in Camp Jupiter, the Roman equivalent of Camp Halfblood, and traveled to the land beyond the gods to complete a dangerous quest. The third book in the Heroes of Olympus series will unite them with Jason, Piper, and Leo. But they number only six--who will complete the Prophecy of Seven?

The Greek and Roman demigods will have to cooperate in order to defeat the giants released by the Earth Mother, Gaea. Then they will have to sail together to the ancient land to find the Doors of Death. What exactly are the Doors of Death? Much of the prophecy remains a mystery. . . .
 
With old friends and new friends joining forces, a marvelous ship, fearsome foes, and an exotic setting, The Mark of Athena promises to be another unforgettable adventure by master storyteller Rick Riordan.





The Chicken Problem, by Jennifer Oxley
      
Full of humor, refreshingly original characters, and math problems that young readers will be clamoring to help solve, The Chicken Problem is an ideal addition to the home or classroom. Left-brained Peg and her right-brained pal, Cat, are enjoying a picnic on the farm with Pig. However, when someone leaves the chicken coop open and the chicks run-a-muck, it's up to Peg and Cat to use their math skills to help solve their poultry predicament.




Dangerously Ever After, by Dashka Slater
         
Not all princesses are made of sugar and spice--some are made of funnier, fiercer stuff

Princess Amanita laughs in the face of danger. Brakeless bicycles, pet scorpions, spiky plants--that's her thing. So when quiet Prince Florian gives her roses, Amanita is unimpressed . . . until she sees their glorious thorns! Now she must have rose seeds of her own. But when huge, honking noses grow instead, what is a princess with a taste for danger to do?

For readers seeking a princess with pluck comes an independent heroine who tackles obstacles with a bouquet of sniffling noses. At once lovely and delightfully absurd, here's a story to show how elastic ideas of beauty and princesses can be.




Black Rabbit, by Phillippa Leathers
         
In this clever picture book, a debut author-illustrator introduces a plucky rabbit and the new companion that he just can’t shake.

Rabbit has a problem. There’s a large black rabbit chasing him. No matter where he runs — behind a tree, over the river — the shadowy rabbit follows. Finally in the deep, dark wood, Rabbit loses his nemesis — only to encounter a real foe! Kids who like to be in on the secret will revel in this humorous look at shadows and friendship, brought to light by a talented animator.




You Only Die Twice, by Dan Gutman
         

The most dangerous road trip in history continues for thirteen-year-old twins Coke and Pepsi McDonald.

Just when they thought they were safe, the twins will be

chased
by an evil Elvis impersonator,

trapped
in a pool of flesh-eating soda pop, nearly

pulverized
in a giant shredder, and

crushed
in a turbo-charged carnival ride.

worst of all,
no one believes them!

Will they make it out alive? Will they ever find out who’s really after them? All bets are off in this explosive third book in the Genius Files series!





In a Glass Grimmly, by Adam Gidwitz
         
More Grimm tales await in the harrowing, hilarious companion to a beloved new classic

Take caution ahead--
Oversize plant life, eerie amphibious royalty, and fear-inducing creatures abound.

Lest you enter with dread.
Follow Jack and Jill as they enter startling new landscapes that may (or may not) be scary, bloody, terrifying, and altogether true.

Step lively, dear reader . . .
Happily ever after isn't cutting it anymore.

In this companion novel to Adam Gidwitz's widely acclaimed, award-winning debut, A Tale Dark & Grimm, Jack and Jill explore a new set of tales from the Brothers Grimm and others, including Jack and the Beanstalk and The Frog Prince.




Mr. Tiger Goes Wild, by Peter Brown
      
Are you bored with being so proper?

Do you want to have more fun?

Mr. Tiger knows exactly how you feel. So he decides to go wild.

But does he go too far?

From Caldecott Honor artist Peter Brown comes a story that shows there's a time and place for everything...even going wild.




Too Much Glue, by Jason Lefebvre
      
Although Matty's art teacher has warned him that too much glue never dries, Matty loves glue. After all, he and his dad make oodles of glue projects at home. One day during art class, Matty finds the fullest bottles of glue, and the fun begins. With a squeeze and a plop, Matty pours a lake of glue before belly-flopping right in the middle and finds himself stuck to the desk.

When Matty's dad arrives at the school, instead of being mad, he celebrates his son's creativity and calls him a work of art. With vibrant language and artwork and a wild, silly plot, Too Much Glue is sure to appeal to all children who love to get messy.




Al Capone Does My Homework, by Gennifer Choldenko
      
Alcatraz Island in the 1930s isn't the most normal place to grow up, but it's home for Moose Flanagan, his autistic sister, Natalie, and all the families of the guards. When Moose's dad gets promoted to Associate Warden, despite being an unlikely candidate, it's a big deal. But the cons have a point system for targeting prison employees, and his dad is now in serious danger. After a fire starts in the Flanagan's apartment, Natalie is blamed, and Moose bands with the other kids to track down the possible arsonist. Then Moose gets a cryptic note from the notorious Al Capone himself. Is Capone trying to protect Moose's dad too? If Moose can't figure out what Capone's note means, it may be too late.

The last heart-pounding installment in the New York Times bestselling, Newbery Honor-winning Alcatraz trilogy is not to be missed!




The Mouse with the Question Mark Tail, by Richard Peck
      
Newbery Award-winning author Richard Peck is at his very best in this fast-paced mystery adventure. Fans of The Tale of Desperaux, A Little Princess, and Stuart Little will all be captivated by this memorable story of a lovable orphan mouse on an amazing quest.

The smallest mouse in London's Royal Mews is such a little mystery that he hasn't even a name. And who were his parents? His Aunt Marigold, Head Needlemouse, sews him a uniform and sends him off to be educated at the Royal Mews Mouse Academy. There he's called "Mouse Minor" (though it's not quite a name), and he doesn't make a success of school. Soon he's running for his life, looking high and low through the grand precincts of Buckingham Palace to find out who he is and who he might become.

Queen Victoria ought to be able to help him, if she can communicate with mice. She is all-seeing, after all, and her powers are unexplainable. But from her, Mouse Minor learns only that you do not get all your answers from the first asking. And so his voyage of self-discovery takes him onward, to strange and wonderful places.




The Apprentices, by Maile Meloy
         
It's 1954, and Janie Scott is in boarding school in New Hampshire, trying to make a new life. Two years have passed since she last saw the mysterious apothecary—or his defiant son, Benjamin. All she knows is that her friends are out there somewhere, trying to keep the world safe in an age of mounting atomic power. On the other side of the world, Benjamin is treating the wounded in a jungle war, and experimenting with a magical new formula that will let him communicate with Janie across the globe.

But Janie has her own experiment underway, and it's attracting interest from sinister forces. Benjamin calls on their friend Pip for help, and they have to race to find one another, and to unravel the mystery of their powerful new enemies.

A magical new adventure, following Maile Meloy's critically acclaimed novel The Apothecary, with captivating illustrations by Ian Schoenherr.




Ever After High, The Storybook Of Legends, by Shannon Hale
         
At Ever After High, an enchanting boarding school, the children of fairytale legends prepare themselves to fulfill their destinies as the next generation of Snow Whites, Prince Charmings and Evil Queens...whether they want to or not. Each year on Legacy Day, students sign the Storybook of Legends to seal their scripted fates. For generations, the Village of Book End has whispered that refusing to sign means The End-both for a story and for a life.

As the daughter of the Evil Queen, Raven Queen's destiny is to follow in her mother's wicked footsteps, but evil is so not Raven's style. She's starting to wonder, what if she rewrote her own story? The royal Apple White, daughter of the Fairest of Them All, has a happy ever after planned for herself, but it depends upon Raven feeding her a poison apple in their future.

What if Raven doesn't sign the Storybook of Legends? It could mean a happily never after for them both.



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Susan B. Anthony, by Alexandra Wallner
      
During Susan B. Anthony's life, women and men were not considered equal. Women could not own property or vote; nor could they receive good educations. But Susan envisioned a time when women would be treated fairly and so became a voice for change. Her speeches and articles about women's suffrage made her unpopular--people threw rotten eggs at her and even threatened her life--yet she did not give up.

In clear and simple words and jewel-like paintings, here is the essential story of the woman whose passion for justice led to the passing of the Nineteenth Amendment, which gave women the right to vote.




Awesome Autumn, by Bruce Goldstone
         

Autumn is awesome! Leaves change color. Animals fly south or get ready to hibernate. People harvest crops and dress up as scary creatures for Halloween. And then there are pickup football games to play, Thanksgiving foods to eat, leaf piles to jump in—all the amazing things that happen as the air turns crisp and cool.

With colorful photographs, lively explanations, and classic craft ideas, Bruce Goldstone has created a festive and fascinating exploration of autumn’s awesomeness.





A Splash of Red: Life & Art of Horace Pippin, by Jen Bryant
         
As a child in the late 1800s, Horace Pippin loved to draw: He loved the feel of the charcoal as it slid across the floor. He loved looking at something in the room and making it come alive again in front of him. He drew pictures for his sisters, his classmates, his co-workers. Even during W.W.I, Horace filled his notebooks with drawings from the trenches . . . until he was shot. Upon his return home, Horace couldn't lift his right arm, and couldn't make any art. Slowly, with lots of practice, he regained use of his arm, until once again, he was able to paint--and paint, and paint! Soon, people—including the famous painter N. C. Wyeth—started noticing Horace's art, and before long, his paintings were displayed in galleries and museums across the country.

Jen Bryant and Melissa Sweet team up once again to share this inspiring story of a self-taught painter from humble beginnings who despite many obstacles, was ultimately able to do what he loved, and be recognized for who he was: an artist.




The Boy on the Wooden Box: How the Impossible Became Possible . . . on Schindler's List, by Leon Leyson
         
Even in the darkest of times—especially in the darkest of times—there is room for strength and bravery. A remarkable memoir from Leon Leyson, one of the youngest children to survive the Holocaust on Oskar Schindler's list.

Leon Leyson (born Leib Lezjon) was only ten years old when the Nazis invaded Poland and his family was forced to relocate to the Krakow ghetto. With incredible luck, perseverance, and grit, Leyson was able to survive the sadism of the Nazis, including that of the demonic Amon Goeth, commandant of Plaszow, the concentration camp outside Krakow. Ultimately, it was the generosity and cunning of one man, a man named Oskar Schindler, who saved Leon Leyson's life, and the lives of his mother, his father, and two of his four siblings, by adding their names to his list of workers in his factory—a list that became world renowned: Schindler's List.

This, the only memoir published by a former Schindler's List child, perfectly captures the innocence of a small boy who goes through the unthinkable. Most notable is the lack of rancor, the lack of venom, and the abundance of dignity in Mr. Leyson's telling. The Boy on the Wooden Box is a legacy of hope, a memoir unlike anything you've ever read.




Ouch!,, by Joe Rhatigan
      
For all those kids who want to be doctors, scientists, or medical professionals, this is their first introduction to how the body works.

Ouch! Comforts hurting kids by explaining the ways they get injured and sick, how their bodies work, and what parents and doctors can do to fix it. It covers all the familiar childhood ailments- upset stomachs, sore throats, earaches, allergies, and infections.




Rush Revere And The Brave Pilgrims, by Rush Limbaugh
         
Nationally syndicated radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh has long wanted to make American history come to life for the children of his listeners, so he created the character of a fearless middle-school history teacher named Rush Revere, who travels back in time and experiences American history as it happens, in adventures with exceptional Americans. In this book, he is transported back to the deck of the Mayflower.



Guiness World Records 2014, by Guiness World Records
         
Guinness World Records 2014 brings together thousands of the planet's most awe-inspiring people, pets and products, including new record-holders such as a skateboarding goat, a 15-meter-long robot dragon, the world's furriest cat and a king-size drumkit that needs five people to play it!

Packed to bursting with new and updated achievements, Guinness World Records 2014 features an all-new design and more images than we've ever had before - including over 100 all-new original photographs you won't find anywhere else. New topics this year include Superheroes, Venom, and Social Networking, and feature chapters on the Circus and Dynamic Earth round off our most exciting and explosive edition yet.

And finally, jumping off the page this year are even more Officially Amazing Augmented Reality features. Just download the free app to your phone or tablet device and look for the "See-It-3D" icons scattered throughout the book.